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How to cite articles and reviews from JNR

We recommend both authors (on CVs, web profiles, etc) and readers to reference materials published in JNR not by traditional page number, but by paragraph number.

Digital publication in the humanities is still in flux. Some journals that publish content both in print and electronic form retain page numbers. All content on JNR is, however, ‘born digital’, and has no paper existence. Since users have ever greater command over the presentation of texts on their screens, we have decided to reference publications by the one factor which will remain unchanged (paragraphs numbers), regardless of future moves to other publication platforms, and regardless of future changes in file formats.

Note: articles are published by issue and year; book reviews are published on a running basis, and are not associated with an issue. For clearer referencing, however, every book review is dated by month and year.

Note: this website offers PDF downloads of articles and book reviews. These accommodate off-line reading, and allow for personal archiving and depositing of JNR publications in Open Access repositories (by their authors). These PDFs are generated ‘on the fly’, and reference should still be made to paragraph numbers, not page numbers.

Suggested reference from a JNR article (particular styles are of course dependent on your chosen reference style):

As argued by Andrew Hadfield, ‘Tacitus has established a powerful model of ethnographic and political analysis’.[1]

[1] Andrew Hadfield, ‘The Idea of North’, Journal of the Northern Renaissance, 1 (2009), par. 4. http://northernrenaissance.org, consulted 1 February 2015

Suggested reference from a JNR book review:

A recent book review suggests how Brueghel’s Biblical and large peasant scenes are still regarded as ‘some of his most contentious paintings’. [1]

[1] Amy Orrock, review of Larry Silver, Pieter BrueghelJournal of the Northern Renaissance, par. 4. November 2012. http://northernrenaissance.org, consulted 15 February 2015